Sunday, 14 October 2012

Unseen bellamy - the story continues

I love the Internet  and the potential to identify works by Frank Bellamy. On the same day I wrote the last blog entry on the "Unseen Bellamy" exhibition of 1989, by sheer coincidence, Len Woodgate wrote to me to tell me he had spotted my notes on the website - not the blog. I have updated the note accompanying the entry on this exhibition. Over to Len:

I have just found your article about the "Unseen Bellamy" exhibition, Basement Gallery, Brixton, and can confirm I bought two pieces from the gallery in 1989. Images of the pieces, “Portrait of Nancy” and “The Postman always calls Twice”, are attached for identification. Both pieces match the sizes quoted and have been stored flat since the very poor frames in which they were exhibited, fell apart.

The Nancy portrait shows some foxing and also signs of unsympathetic care in the past but overall looks good.

Item # 22
The “Postman” piece has fared rather better, being on card, and contains the legend “James M Cain’s – “The Postman always rings twice” confirming what you thought about reference to the novel. I also have several of the postcards advertising the Brixton event using this artwork. 
Item # 3
Lastly I have a single “Garth” strip purchased from a Comic fair. I don’t know the story it is from, but it is referenced K141 and dated 15-6-76.

One of Item # 43
I let Len know that the Garth is from the Spanish Lady story which ran from from 17 March 1976 - 7July 1976 (numbers K65-K160) and was reprinted, coloured in June to August last year!

Regarding the portrait, it is unknown at which portrait of Nancy that Anthony Crossland was looking (or for that matter when) but, when asked in an interview,did she pose for Frank, Nancy Bellamy recounted:

Yes, though I hated posing because I had to sit still for such a long period of time. Anyway, he begged me so much that I relented and let him draw me. There was a little story attached to it: when the drawing was hanging in the Camberwell Art Gallery, we got a phone call from Antony Crossland the MP and minister, who said he would like the name and number of the model. I understood that at that time the House of Commons had their own little painting group which they must have used for relaxation. Anyway, my husband said "It’s my wife" and got quite embarrassed, so that was the end of the conversation!

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